Indiana Landmarks News

Hidden Gems

Greentown Glass by Ken Ratcliff on Flickr
Hidden Gems

Though only in business from 1894 to 1903, the Indiana Tumbler and Goblet Company in Greentown produced glassware that remains collectible today.

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Marquette Park lagoons
Hidden Gems

Tucked away between stretches of the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, Gary’s Marquette Park is a jewel for families, paddlers, and birdwatchers alike.

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Roann Covered Bridge
Events, Hidden Gems, News

Its picturesque setting on the Eel River in Wabash County makes Roann a favorite of tourists and artists. With a tree-lined downtown, a restored covered bridge, and a historic mill, the small town could hardly be more quaint.

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Downtown Vevay, Swiss Wine Festival
Events, Hidden Gems

Switzerland County’s wine-making heritage dates back more than 200 years, a local tradition the community celebrates each summer during the Swiss Wine Festival in Vevay.

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Musee de Venoge
Events, Hidden Gems, Tours

From fire-fodder to restored rarity, Vevay’s Musee De Venoge tells a story worth learning. Enjoy an 1815-style Fourth of July celebration at the living history museum, June 30 and July 1.

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Working Men's Institute, New Harmony
Hidden Gems

Part library, part museum, part memorial to a Utopian dream, the Working Men’s Institute in New Harmony offers a unique glimpse of early nineteenth-century history and one man’s commitment to the power of knowledge.

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Goshen Police Booth
Hidden Gems

At the corner of Main and Lincoln on Goshen’s courthouse square, an unassuming building gave the people of Goshen the reassurance they needed to sleep peacefully at night during the Great Depression.

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Tyson Temple, Versailles, Indiana. Photo by Lee Lewellen.
Hidden Gems

James Tyson, Versailles native and co-founder of Walgreen’s, left his hometown an impressive architectural legacy in the form of Tyson Methodist Temple.

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Marktown, East Chicago, Indiana
Hidden Gems

Sandwiched between East Chicago’s hulking steel mills and refineries, the quaint anachronism called Marktown originated in 1917 as a planned community for workers

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