Indiana Landmarks News

Endangered Places

Newkirk Mansion, Connersville
Endangered Places, News, Saved

It’s one of the Indiana’s most architecturally distinctive homes, and after decades of neglect Connersville’s Newkirk Mansion is back in the hands of owners who cherish it.

KEEP READING
Ford Plant Indianapolis
Endangered Places, Indiana Automotive Landmarks, News, Saved, Tours

The long vacant 1914 Ford Motor Company Plant in Indianapolis passes to new ownership this month, ensuring a sustainable future for an important automotive landmark.

KEEP READING
Newkirk mansion Connersville
Endangered Places, News

The Newkirk Mansion dazzles atop a hill overlooking Connersville. Without a new owner and an aggressive restoration plan, however, the house could become another loss.

KEEP READING
1956 Green Book
African American Landmarks, Endangered Places, Indiana Automotive Landmarks

Victor Hugo Green, Harlem postal worker turned travel agent, published the Negro Motorist Green Book from 1936-1967. The guide recommended businesses and attractions around the country, including sites in Indiana, that would be friendly to African American travelers.

KEEP READING
Endangered Places, News

Indiana Landmarks seeks a solution for the declining Masonic temple built in 1926, now under threat of demolition.

KEEP READING
Koerner Block, Birdseye
Endangered Places, News

A coalition of Birdseye and Dubois County residents have joined with Indiana Landmarks to try to raise $35,000 to stabilize the partially collapsed Koerner Block.

KEEP READING
Montgomery House for sale, Paoli
Endangered Places, News

We hope to save a threatened landmark home in Paoli by marketing it to a preservation-minded buyer.

KEEP READING
Medora Brick Company, IN
Endangered Places, News

Volunteer cleanup marks the start of renewed efforts to preserve and find a new use for the Medora Brick Company in Jackson County.

KEEP READING
Mount Pleasant Beech Church
African American Landmarks, Endangered Places, News

A spot on Indiana’s 10 Most Endangered list may seem like ignoble distinction, but for Mount Pleasant Beech Church it has been the catalyst for financial support critical to saving the imperiled landmark.

KEEP READING