Indiana Landmarks News

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Endangered Places, Rehabs & Renovations, Saved

When a landmark gets the white elephant label, the word demolition usually surfaces. Indiana Landmarks tries to save these historic structures, helping to identify new purposes and imaginative developers.

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Newkirk Mansion, Connersville
Endangered Places, News, Saved

It’s one of the Indiana’s most architecturally distinctive homes, and after decades of neglect Connersville’s Newkirk Mansion is back in the hands of owners who cherish it.

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Ford Plant Indianapolis
Endangered Places, Indiana Automotive Landmarks, News, Saved, Tours

The long vacant 1914 Ford Motor Company Plant in Indianapolis passes to new ownership this month, ensuring a sustainable future for an important automotive landmark.

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Acorn Hall, Greendale
News, Saved

Built for a whiskey distiller in 1883, Acorn Hall in Greendale was left in limbo in recent years by a complicated foreclosure. Now, Bill and Nancy Smith are bringing the home back to its former glory. 

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News, Rehabs & Renovations, Saved

Heroic restoration of the city’s 1865 opera house sparks revitalization throughout downtown.

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Pennsylvania Railroad Station, Richmond Depot
News, Saved

After decades of vacancy and a roller coaster ride of redevelopment proposals, Richmond’s historic Pennsylvania Railroad Station is ready to thrive for the first time since the 1970s.

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White Castle #3, Indianapolis
News, Saved

Indiana Landmarks saves one of the oldest original White Castle restaurants.

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News, Rehabs & Renovations, Saved, Tours

Today, as many small towns suffer population loss and the accompanying disinvestment and vacancy, Wabash remains a risk-taking, can-do place known for revitalized buildings, thriving small businesses, and capitalizing on heritage.

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Indiana Automotive Landmarks, Rehabs & Renovations, Saved

When production ends, it doesn’t have to mean the end of the line for a historic factory. Around the state, developers have turned factories into places where people live, eat, shop, and play.

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